English - Japanese Dictionary:

King

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The definition of word "King":
+1 rate 1. n - (the title of) a male ruler of a country, who holds this position because of his royal birth Prince Henry became king when his father died. During the war, the King and Queen visited those areas of London worst affected by the bombing. The king of a group of animals, things or people is the largest, most important or best of that group. The lion is called the king of the jungle. Petrus is the king of wines. Segovia was (the) king of the guitar (= the best player of that instrument) . If something has king as part of its name, it means it is larger than the ordinary type. king prawnsa king cobra In the game of chess, the king is the most important piece on the board. It can move one square in any direction. See picture: Games A king is also a card with a picture of a king on it, used in games. the king of hearts See study section: Playing cards Her diamond necklace must have cost a king's ransom (= a lot of money) . If something is king-size or king-sized, it is larger than the ordinary size. a king-size beda king-size hamburger
+1 rate 2. born March 24, 1755, Scarborough, Mass. died April 29, 1827, Jamaica, New York, United States U.S. diplomat. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress (1784–87), where he called for a new constitution. He helped frame the Constitution of the United States and effected its ratification by Massachusetts. In 1788 he moved to New York, where he was elected one of the state's first United States senators (1789–96, 1813–25). He became a strong leader of the Federalist Party and introduced the antislavery provision of the 1787 document that formed part of the Northwest Ordinances. He served as ambassador to Britain from 1796 to 1803 and from 1825 to 1826.
+1 rate 3. King B.B.
+1 rate 4. Vidor King Wallis
+1 rate 5. Mary Queen of Scots
rate 6. excellent; top-notch; wonderful; the best; enormous; huge
rate 7. severe decisive blow
rate 8. punch from behind
rate 9. any sudden misfortune
rate 10. punch forcibly and without warning
rate 11. King Radio Corp. (Avionics mfgr.)
rate 12. feminine queen a supreme ruler, sovereign over a nation or a territory, of higher rank than any other secular ruler except an emperor, to whom a king may be subject. Kingship, a worldwide phenomenon, can be elective, as in medieval Germany, but is usually hereditary; it may be absolute or constitutional and usually takes the form of a monarchy, although dyarchies have been known, as in ancient Sparta, where two kings ruled jointly. The king has often stood as mediator between his people and their god, or, as in ancient Sumer, as the god's representative. Sometimes he himself has been regarded as divine and has become the key figure in fertility rituals; such religions often ultimately required the death either of the king himself or of an official substitute as a sacrifice to the gods. The concept of divinity, brought in from Egypt, characterized the Hellenistic Age and was later revived by the Roman emperors. The Christian Roman emperors assumed authority as representatives of God, and, in medieval political theory, kingship was early regarded as to some extent analogous with the priesthood, the ceremony of anointing at the coronation becoming highly significant. The absolute monarchies of the 16th to 18th century were often strengthened by the establishment of nationalist churches; but from the 17th century in England and, later, in other countries, kingship was made constitutional, royal power being held to derive from the people rather than from God.
rate 13. orig. Nathaniel Adams Coles; born March 17, 1917, Montgomery, Ala., United States died February 15, 1965, Santa Monica, Calif. United States jazz pianist and singer. Cole grew up in Chicago and formed a trio in Los Angeles (1939), establishing himself as a major jazz piano stylist. Commercial success, however, came with his singing. His warm, relaxed voice brought a personal touch to the ballads and light swing in which he specialized. "Mona Lisa" and "Unforgettable" were among his major hits of the 1950s. He excelled as a stage personality and he was also a capable film actor.
rate 14. orig. Billie Jean Moffitt; born November 22, 1943, Long Beach, Calif., United States U.S. tennis player. She won her first Wimbledon doubles championship in 1961 as part of the youngest team to do so. She went on to capture a record 20 Wimbledon titles (singles, women's doubles and mixed doubles) from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s; in 2003 her record was tied by Martina Navratilova. She also won several United States singles titles (1967, 1971–72, 1974) and the Australian (1968) and French (1972) titles. She was ranked first in the United States seven times and first in the world five times. In 1973 she defeated the 55-year-old former men's champion Bobby Riggs in a widely publicized "Battle of the Sexes." She was cofounder and first president (1974) of the Women's Tennis Association and in 1974, with her husband, Larry King, she also founded World TeamTennis, of which she served as director. She wrote two autobiographies (with cowriters) and a history of women's tennis and she cofounded the magazine Womensport.; Billie Jean King. Colorsport
rate 15. orig. Lawrence Harvey Zeiger; born November 19, 1993, Brooklyn, New York, United States U.S. talk-show host. He worked in Miami, Fla., as a radio disc jockey, talk-show host and freelance broadcaster and writer (1957–78). He hosted the popular national radio talk show The Larry King Show (1978–94) and, since 1985, the television talk show Larry King Live on CNN. Known for his easygoing interviewing style with celebrities, newsmakers and world leaders, he conducted more than 30,000 interviews on his two shows.
rate 16. born January 15, 1929, Atlanta, Ga., United States died April 4, 1968, Memphis, Tenn. United States civil-rights leader. The son and grandson of Baptist preachers, King became an adherent of nonviolence while in college. Ordained a Baptist minister himself in 1954, he became pastor of a church in Montgomery, Ala. the following year he received a doctorate from Boston University. He was selected to head the Montgomery Improvement Association, whose boycott efforts eventually ended the city's policies of racial segregation on public transportation. In 1957 he formed the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and began lecturing nationwide, urging active nonviolence to achieve civil rights for African Americans. In 1960 he returned to Atlanta to become copastor with his father of Ebenezer Baptist Church. He was arrested and jailed for protesting segregation at a lunch counter; the case drew national attention and presidential candidate John F. Kennedy interceded to obtain his release. In 1963 King helped organize the March on Washington, an assembly of more than 200,000 protestors at which he made his famous "I have a dream" speech. The march influenced the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and King was awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize for Peace. In 1965 he was criticized from within the civil-rights movement for yielding to state troopers at a march in Selma, Ala. and for failing in the effort to change Chicago's housing segregation policies. Thereafter he broadened his advocacy, addressing the plight of the poor of all races and opposing the Vietnam War. In 1968 he went to Memphis, Tenn., to support a strike by sanitation workers; there on April 4, he was assassinated by James Earl Ray. A United States national holiday is celebrated in King's honour on the third Monday in January.; Martin Luther King, Jr. Julian Wasser
rate 17. born September 21, 1947, Portland, Maine, United States U.S. writer. Educated at the University of Maine, he wrote a number of enormously popular books, which made him one of the world's best-selling writers. His books blend horror, the macabre, fantasy and science fiction. Carrie (1974; film 1976), his first published novel and an immediate success, was followed by a long string of popular books, including The Shining (1977; film, 1980; television miniseries, 1997), The Dead Zone (1979; film, 1983), Pet Sematery (1983; film, 1989) and Misery (1987; film, 1990). Most of his novels have been adapted for television or film and most have been translated into many languages.
rate 18. born September 21, 1947, Portland, Maine, United States U.S. writer. Educated at the University of Maine, he wrote a number of enormously popular books, which made him one of the world's best-selling writers. His books blend horror, the macabre, fantasy and science fiction. Carrie (1974; film 1976), his first published novel and an immediate success, was followed by a long string of popular books, including The Shining (1977; film, 1980; television miniseries, 1997), The Dead Zone (1979; film, 1983), Pet Sematery (1983; film, 1989) and Misery (1987; film, 1990). Most of his novels have been adapted for television or film and most have been translated into many languages.
rate 19. born Dec. 17, 1874, Berlin, Ontario, Canada died July 22, 1950, Kingsmere, Que. Prime minister of Canada (1921–26, 1926–30, 1935–48). The grandson of William L. Mackenzie, he was deputy minister of labour (1900–08) before being appointed Canada's first minister of labour (1909–11). Reelected to the Canadian Parliament (1919), he became leader of the Liberal Party. As prime minister, he favoured social reform without socialism; he led the government with support from an alliance of Liberals and Progressives. He effected a more independent relationship between the Commonwealth nations and Britain. During and after World War II he unified a country often divided between English and French constituents.
rate 20. born Dec. 17, 1874, Berlin, Ontario, Canada died July 22, 1950, Kingsmere, Que. Prime minister of Canada (1921–26, 1926–30, 1935–48). The grandson of William L. Mackenzie, he was deputy minister of labour (1900–08) before being appointed Canada's first minister of labour (1909–11). Reelected to the Canadian Parliament (1919), he became leader of the Liberal Party. As prime minister, he favoured social reform without socialism; he led the government with support from an alliance of Liberals and Progressives. He effected a more independent relationship between the Commonwealth nations and Britain. During and after World War II he unified a country often divided between English and French constituents.
rate 21. born April 7, 1786, Sampson county, N.C., United States died April 18, 1853, Cahaba, Ala. United States politician. A member of the United States House of Representatives from North Carolina from 1811, he resigned from the House in 1816 to serve as secretary of legation to William Pinkney, the United States minister plenipotentiary to Russia. Upon his return, he moved to Alabama and became one of the state's first United States senators (1819–44, 1848–52). As minister to France from 1844 to 1846, he convinced the French government not to interfere with the United States annexation of Texas. In 1852 he was elected United States vice president under Franklin Pierce, but he died shortly after taking the oath of office.
rate 22. Narrow gorge, Upper Egypt, near the ancient city of Thebes. It is the burial site of nearly all of the kings (pharaohs) of the 18th–20th dynasties (1539–1075 BC), from Thutmose I to Ramses XI. The valley contains 60 tombs, virtually all of which were robbed in antiquity. Only the tomb of Tutankhamen escaped pillage; after its excavation in the 1920s, its treasures were placed in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The longest tomb belongs to Queen Hatshepsut, whose burial chamber is nearly 700 ft (215 m) from the entrance. The largest tomb, built for the sons of Ramses II, contains 67 burial chambers.
rate 23. known as the Citizen King; born October 6, 1773, Paris, France; died August 26, 1850, Claremont, Surrey, Eng. King of the French (1830–48). Eldest son of the duke d'Orléans, he supported the new government at the outbreak of the French Revolution and joined the Revolutionary army in 1792 but deserted during the war with Austria (1793) and lived in exile in Switzerland, the United States and England. He returned to France on the restoration of Louis XVIII and joined the liberal opposition. Following the July Revolution (1830) and Charles X's abdication, he was proclaimed the "Citizen King" by Adolphe Thiers and elected by the legislature. During the subsequent July Monarchy, he consolidated his power by steering a middle course between the right-wing monarchists and the socialists and other republicans but resorted to repressive measures because of numerous rebellions and attempts on his life. He strengthened France's position in Europe and cooperated with the British in forcing the Dutch to recognize Belgian independence. Mounting middle-class opposition to his arbritrary rule and his inability to win allegiance from the new industrial classes caused his abdication during the February Revolution of 1848.
rate 24. Margaret of France French Marguerite known as Queen Margot; born May 14, 1553, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France; died March 27, 1615, Paris; Queen consort of Navarra who played a secondary part in the Wars of Religion (1562–98). The daughter of Henry II of France, her relations with her brothers Charles IX and the future Henry III were strained and she had an early affair with Henri, duke de Guise, leader of the extremist Catholic party. She was married in 1572 to the Protestant king of Navarra, the future Henry IV of France, to seal the peace between Catholics and Protestants, but days later the Massacre of Saint Bartholomew's Day began. Aware of her involvement in conspiracies, Henry III banished her to the castle at Usson in 1586. She granted her husband an annulment in 1600 and lived out her life in Paris. She was known for her beauty, learning and licentious life; her Mémoires provide a vivid picture of France during her lifetime.
rate 25. orig. Meyer R. Schkolnick; born July 4, 1910, Philadelphia, Pa., United States died February 23, 2003, New York, New York United States sociologist. After receiving a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1936, Merton taught there and at Tulane University before moving to Columbia University, where he was a professor from 1941 to 1979. His diverse interests included deviant behaviour, the sociology of science and mass communications and he generally advanced a functionalist approach to the study of society. He was awarded a National Medal of Science in 1994. Among his writings are Mass Persuasion (1946), Social Theory and Social Structure (1949), On the Shoulders of Giants (1965) and The Sociology of Science (1973).
rate 26. orig. Joseph Oliver; born May 11, 1885, Abend, La., United States died April 8, 1938, Savannah, Ga. United States jazz cornetist and bandleader. Oliver grew up in New Orleans and established himself as the city's preeminent cornetist, coleading a band with trombonist Kid Ory (1886–1973) before moving to Chicago in 1918. In 1922 Oliver hired his New Orleans protégé Louis Armstrong to join him in Chicago in his Creole Jazz Band. Their recordings together, including "Dipper Mouth Blues," are jazz classics.
rate 27. born February 8, 1894, Galveston, Texas, United States died November 1, 1982, Paso Robles, Calif. United States film director. He worked as a prop boy, scriptwriter, newsreel cameraman and assistant director before directing his first feature film, The Turn in the Road (1919). He won acclaim for The Big Parade (1925) and The Crowd (1928), considered a silent-movie classic. His films, which deal with themes such as idealism and disillusionment in contemporary life, include the first all-African American film, Hallelujah! (1929), as well as Our Daily Bread (1934) and The Citadel (1938). His later movies include the western epic Duel in the Sun (1946), The Fountainhead (1949) and War and Peace (1956).
rate 28. born February 8, 1894, Galveston, Texas, United States died November 1, 1982, Paso Robles, Calif. United States film director. He worked as a prop boy, scriptwriter, newsreel cameraman and assistant director before directing his first feature film, The Turn in the Road (1919). He won acclaim for The Big Parade (1925) and The Crowd (1928), considered a silent-movie classic. His films, which deal with themes such as idealism and disillusionment in contemporary life, include the first all-African American film, Hallelujah! (1929), as well as Our Daily Bread (1934) and The Citadel (1938). His later movies include the western epic Duel in the Sun (1946), The Fountainhead (1949) and War and Peace (1956).
rate 29. orig. Hiram King Williams; born September 17, 1923, Georgiana, Ala., United States died January 1, 1953, Oak Hill, W.Va. United States singer and guitarist. Williams was born into poverty. He began playing guitar at age 8, made his radio debut at 13 and formed his first band, Hank Williams and his Drifting Cowboys, at 14. With the help of Fred Rose, his "Lovesick Blues" became a smash hit in 1949 and he joined the Grand Ole Opry that year after an extraordinary debut appearance. Among his best-selling recordings were "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," "Jambalaya," "Your Cheatin' Heart," and "Hey, Good Lookin'." He wrote almost all the songs he recorded. His death from heart failure at 29 may have resulted from drug and alcohol abuse. He remains perhaps the most revered figure in the history of country music. His son, Hank Williams, Jr., has had an exceptional recording career and grandson Hank Williams III is also a musician.
rate 30. Male sovereign over a nation or territory, of higher rank than any other ruler except an emperor. A king's female counterpart is a queen. Some kings have been elected, as in medieval Germany, but most inherit the position. The community may concentrate all spiritual and political power in the sovereign, or power may be shared constitutionally with other government institutions. Some kings are heads of state but not heads of government. In the past, some were regarded as semidivine representatives of God on Earth; others were viewed as gods in their own right or supernatural beings who became gods after death. Since the 17th century the power held by monarchs, particularly those in western Europe, has been widely regarded as deriving from the people.
rate 31. King Philip
rate 32. king salmon
rate 33. Cole Nat King
rate 34. Frederick the Winter King
rate 35. King Cotton
rate 36. king crab
rate 37. Alaskan king crab
rate 38. King George Sound
rate 39. King George's War
rate 40. King Philip's War
rate 41. king snake
rate 42. King William's War
rate 43. King Billie Jean
rate 44. King Larry
rate 45. King Martin Luther Jr.
rate 46. King Rufus
rate 47. King Stephen Edwin
rate 48. King William Lyon Mackenzie
rate 49. King William Rufus de Vane
rate 50. Mad King Ludwig
rate 51. the Sun King
rate 52. the Citizen King
rate 53. Merton Robert King
rate 54. Oliver King
rate 55. Hiram King Williams
rate 56. Leslie Lynch King Jr.
rate 57. Lovelace Augusta Ada King countess of
rate 58. Queen Anne's lace
rate 59. Queen Anne style
rate 60. Queen Anne's War
rate 61. Queen Charlotte Islands
rate 62. Queen Charlotte Sound
rate 63. Queen Elizabeth Islands
rate 64. Queen Elizabeth National Park
rate 65. Queen's University at Kingston
rate 66. Sheba Queen of
rate 67. Queen Margot
rate 68. Queen Ellery
rate 69. Kings Canyon National Park
rate 70. Kings Mountain Battle of
rate 71. Kings Valley of the;
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seiki, arushio-ne, hitotsubanashi, nee, genshinkurokku, asai, monki-banana, ryoukai, jaza-saizu, faiainshuaransu
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